Mangrove planting in Madagascar

Context

Madagascar is more than just an island from an animated movie. It’s a nation with over 200,000 species of plants and animals that don’t exist anywhere else in the world. But more than 90% of Madagascar’s original forests have been destroyed, displacing entire animal species and taking away the Malagasy’s ability to farm and live on the land. Entire mangrove estuaries are gone, leaving the bare earth to wash away into the sea.

10 percent

of Madagascars original forest remains after years of deforestation.

75 percent

of species in Madagascar does not live anywhere else on the planet.

How your funding helps

Your funding helps restore ecologically devastated mangrove estuaries in the northwest of the country, through our partnership with Eden Reforestation.

Mangrove forests are carbon storing ecosystems whose dense roots serve as an anchor for the soil, preventing erosion and removing of CO2 from the atmosphere. What began as primarily mangrove restoration and reforestation in 2007 grew to include a variety of native dry deciduous species in 2012.

Our partnership also include two National Park systems, which aim to reforest and revive natural habitat for endangered and endemic animal species.

Mangrove c02 efficiency

In 2019 a joint letter from 11,000 scientists declaring a climate emergency, they had singled out restoring mangroves as a major natural climate solution. They store four times as much carbon as a tropical rainforest.

Each mangrove tree removes around 308kg of CO2 from the atmosphere over the course of its life-cycle (approximately 25 years).

Mangroves make up less than 2 percent of marine environments but account for 10 to 15 percent of carbon burial. This form of carbon storage is known as ‘blue carbon’. One acre of mangrove forest can store about 658kg (1,450Ibs) of carbon per year — roughly the same amount emitted by a car driving across the United States and back (5,875 miles)

Mangrove trees store four times as much carbon as a tropical rainforest. 75% of all tropical fish are born amongst their roots.

“The amount of carbon released as a consequence of mangroves deforestation is equivalent to the annual emissions of Myanmar.”

Protecting animal species

Unfortunately, more than ninety percent of Madagascar’s original forests have been destroyed, displacing entire animal species.  Our partnership also include two National Park systems, which aim to reforest and revive natural habitat for endangered and endemic animal species. Through your support, you also help protect these species.

Climate solution #5

Tropical forests

 

In theory, 751 million acres of degraded land in the tropics could be restored to continuous, intact forest. Using current and estimated commitments from the Bonn Challenge and New York Declaration on Forests, our model assumes that restoration could occur on 435 million acres. Through natural regrowth, committed land could sequester 1.4 tons of carbon dioxide per acre annually, for a total of 61.2 gigatons of carbon dioxide by 2050. Only carbon stored in soil organic matter and aboveground biomass is accounted for; below-ground biomass is not included.

Third party audit

Eden Reforestation Projects have a brilliant track record of meeting the reported numbers of trees. At least once a year the project planting sites are visited by a third party to audit the reported number of healthy trees.

UN’s Sustainable Development Goals recognized by this project

As an Sprout member your money goes towards supporting projects that are in line with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Here are the goals recognized by the Madagascar reforestation project:

Read more about the Sustainable Development Goals

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